How We Created Intel’s Capital Diversity Fund

curated from  Fast Company

A VP AT INTEL CAPITAL EXPLAINS HOW THEY CREATED THEIR $125 MILLION FUND FOR COMPANIES RUN BY WOMEN AND MINORITIES, AND WHY WE NEED IT.

That conversation put Intel Capital on a path to this week’s unveiling of our $125 million Diversity Fund—one that’s more than 10 times larger than anything similar in the finance industry, and which has already announced investments in the security software, healthcare, the Internet of Things, and do-it-yourself maker markets.

“WHAT IF WE TOOK STAKES IN HIGH-GROWTH COMPANIES RUN BY WOMEN AND UNDERREPRESENTED MINORITIES, WHOSE BIGGEST HURDLE WASN’T THE QUALITY OF THEIR IDEAS BUT THE FUNDING TO MAKE THEM SCALE?”

“IN AN INDUSTRY OBSESSED WITH NUMBERS, THE REPRESENTATION OF WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN HIGH TECH IS A FAILURE BY ANY MEASURE.”

Oftentimes, we see a number of the big firms that have no women partners at all. So when a woman pitches, there’s just no organic knowledge about many of the markets that are really growing right now, where there are really great opportunities and a need for venture capital.

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The Remarkable Power of Doing Absolutely Nothing

curated from Inc.

Sometimes you can accomplish more by doing less–far less.

Can you recall the last time you felt well rested?

Sadly, most people can’t.

It’s much easier to do almost anything incessantly than to spend time doing nothing.

What people don’t realize is this: Doing nothing gives you the chance to grow. Being alone without obligation–without the nagging feeling that you’re doing less than you should–allows you to look inward. Without an activity to distract your mind, you must think about yourself.

The famous financier J.P. Morgan used to insist on taking two months off every year. “I can get done in 10 months what I could never do in 12,” he used to say.

Take a step back from being overwhelmed, take a deep breath, and take the time to reach your full potential.

 

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Entrepreneurs Need to Focus on Culture, Not Perks

curated from Entrepreneur

Entrepreneur and CultureIQ are searching for the top high-performing cultures to be featured on our annual list.

I like to define culture in terms of a high-performance culture, one that exhibits qualities like communication, collaboration, mission and value alignment, innovation and accountability.

I’m not saying that perks are bad. In fact, perks can enhance culture, but they shouldn’t serve as a substitute for culture

Here are a few lessons about crafting a high-performance culture that I’ve learned along the way

Listen to your employees

In each of the three companies that I’ve founded, I had a vision for building a solution and a company.Then I recruited great people and formed teams to help pursue that vision. In every single case, the product and solution expanded beyond my initial vision, and it became better, more beautiful and functional than I had previously imagined.

Foster personal and professional development

I’ve seen some great examples of personal and professional development programs that do not need to cost a dime. One of my favorite examples is reverse mentoring, where junior employees mentor someone in a more senior role about their expertise. My marketing manager is decades younger in her career than me, yet she is much more fluent in the world of social media and she coaches me on navigating this critical component of our business.

Create traditions grounded in values

One Friday as we were taking off for the weekend, I wanted to acknowledge how committed we’d been all week, rather than just saying “see you soon.” Spontaneously, I shook hands with my two colleagues. It felt like an appropriate way to punctuate everything we had accomplished that week and also a sign of mutual respect for a job well done.

Be creative, and be a community

It didn’t matter that the award was a plastic toy. What mattered was that the award was rooted in traditions, in employees and in shared experiences.

 

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11 Successful Women Who Know Life Is So Much More Than Your Work

curated from The Huffington Post

Life doesn’t have to be all about your 9 to 5 — just ask some of the world’s most driven women.

what’s the story that your life is going to tell?

Here are 11 amazing pieces of life advice from women we love.

“We think, mistakenly,that success is the result of the amount of time we put in at work,instead of the quality we of time we put in.”

                                          – Arianna Huffington

“I LOVE TO SEE A YOUNG GIRL GO OUT AND GRAB THE WORLD BY THE LAPELS.LIFE’S A BITCH.YOU’VE GOT TO GO OUT AND KICK ASS.”

                                                 – MAYA ANGELOU

“DON’T CONFUSE HAVING A CAREER WITH HAVING A LIFE.”

– HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON

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How Franchising Took This Business Into New Waters

curated from Entrepreneur

As a teenager in the 1960s, Rita Goldberg was a favorite to make the British Olympic swim team when an injury ended her career.

“It was my lifetime’s light switch,” Goldberg says. “This older man just loved to teach. And I was just a housewife without a job who was never interested in business. But after seeing that school, I knew what I wanted to do.”

“They kept coming and leaving. Something was missing. I realized I needed someone who’s really a part of the business. That’s the route that took me to franchising.”

her British Swim School has sold 28 locations in nine states and recently had its first franchisee reach the $1 million revenue mark.

“What I try to explain is, swimming is our product,” she says. “You don’t have to be able to teach it in order to sell it.”

“I never expected this brand to do as well as it’s done, but I’m absolutely thrilled with the way it’s working,” she says. “People say it’s a brilliant idea. I tell them I really don’t know how this all happened!”

 

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This Exceptional 9-Year-Old Entrepreneur Owns a $1 Million Business

curated from Inc.

Entrepreneurs can learn a few important lessons from kidpreneur Evan.

Meet EvanTubeHD, an enterprising young man with more than a million subscribers and a billion views on his YouTube channel.

Did I mention he’s only 9?!

It’s not as outrageous as you might imagine. It all started when Evan began reviewing his favorite video games and toys on video–with the help of his dad Jared

Evan and Jared began making Angry Birds stop-motion clay videos, which they posted on YouTube to share with friends

They turned to Maker Studios, an advertising network and production company that specializes in YouTube talent

Here are a few YouTube business tips you can put to work for you, based on Evan’s entrepreneurial success:

  1. Persistence is key.

Keep creating content and be persistent.

2. Connect with your Audience.

Understand what need you’re serving for them

3. Provide Value.

Evan provides a valuable service by potentially saving people money, allowing them to “test-drive” games and toys through him before they buy.

4. Stand Out. Be Unique.

Maybe it’s based on a skill you have, like Evan’s stop-motion clay figurine videos. It could just as easily be your personality or a contrary stance on an issue.

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Women: Lift As You Climb

“There is a special place in hell for women who don’t help other women.”

curated from Forbes

These words by America’s first female, ceiling-smashing Secretary of State, Madeleine Albright, reflect two truths:

  1. The strong value many women place on supporting other women to achieve their ambitions as they pursue our own.
  2. Acknowledgement that not all women value the “sisterhood,” opting instead to pull the ladder up behind them as they climb, presumably because they don’t think other women should have it any easier than they did.

With over 35,000 members in Australia, and soon to expand in the USA, Business Chicks hosts events that bring women together to help each other,

A quick glance at the statistics on the state of women globally tell us that much work is still to be done to create an even playing field for girls and women.

The Dalai Lama once said “The world will be saved by the western woman.”

helping other women get ahead won’t diminish your position or power, it will enhance it.

We grow muscles by lifting weights; we grow powerful by lifting each other.

 

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Learn To Be Comfortable Saying ‘No’ Or You Won’t Be Available To Say ‘Yes’ When It Really Matters

curated from Forbes

“It’s only by saying “no” that you can concentrate on the things that are really important.” – Steve Jobs

Saying “No” can be awkward, uncomfortable, and downright difficult.

Let’s face it, it feels good to be needed, so the last thing we want is for people to stop needing us because we say “No” to them.

so I sat down and made a list of ways to help me know when to say “No”.

1. Set boundaries and stick with them. No exceptions.

Everyone has to determine what their set boundaries will be for their own life, but whatever they are I would advise that once you set them it is imperative that you never allow them to be broken.

2. Just because you have an opening on your calendar doesn’t mean you have to fill it.

The reality is that there are plenty of things you need to get done that don’t require a scheduled appointment, so consider those blank spaces on your calendar as invisible scheduled appointments for working on your to-do list.

3. Don’t answer immediately.

Ask for time to look at your schedule or time to evaluate your existing to-do list so you can step away and really think through if this is something you should take on or not.

4. Ask yourself if saying “Yes” is really the right thing to do.

Things come at us fast and furious and we often get caught up doing “stuff” that isn’t helping us progress toward our goals, so really consider whether taking this new assignment on will bring you closer to achieving your goals.

5. You’re not doing someone a favor if you say “Yes” to something you don’t have the capacity for.

There are often things we would be willing to do, or feel obligated to do, or that we may even want to do, but before we say yes we really need to check where the request would fall on our existing list of prioritized items.

6. Consider asking to modify the scope of what is being asked for.

Keep in mind that the overly difficult requests usually stem from a lack of understanding that can easily be rectified with a little communication when it is done in a respectful way.

7. Give people the right instruction when you are Out of Office.

 

Saying “No” may never feel good, but I guarantee that being available to say “Yes” when it really matters will!

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The Do’s and Don’ts of Running Your Own Business According to Kabbage Founder Kathryn Petralia

curated from Project Eve

Kathryn Petralia, co-founder and CEO of Kabbage, shared that she diverted from her original path to become an English professor. And even though that happened, she didn’t fail to embrace interesting opportunities. She pioneered Kabbage, the first online financial services data and technology platform to provide fully automated small business loans. For the last 20 years, she has also worked with data and technology platform to provide fully automated small business loans.

Here are some of the tips she swears by:

1. Do keep an open mind. Stay open to the right opportunities that will come your way.
2. Do find a strong partner and support system. Having a partner who brings different strengths to the table will be beneficial. Also find mentors that will help you brainstorm and vet your ideas.
3. Do perfect your pitch. Articulate your business idea quickly, clearly and concisely when talking to networking or investors.
4. Do invest where it matters. Don’t splurge on unneccesary parties and invest where it will have the most impact: something that benefits customers, employees or investors.
5. Do make time for networking. Identify industry events, professional organizations and conferences that can acquaint you with those who can further your business.
6. Do plan ahead. Success depends on looking into the future and gauging what you’ll need months and years down the road.
7. Don’t act hastily. It’s important to take a breath, ask the right questions and get the full story before taking action.
8. Don’t be intimidated. Focus on being prepared, getting the investors excited about your business and presenting facts to support your claims.
9. Don’t take no for an answer. Don’t stop with a “no” – ask the person who says no to recommend whom you should approach next.

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